Reading Week / Invisible Systems

I have lots of blog posts lined up as I've had two weeks away from Falmouth, so I'll be trying to get them all posted during this week now I'm back. Last week I was in Venice so there's many inspiring points to write about that and two weeks ago I was back in Bedford for reading week. I got to see my parents and little sister after six weeks apart, met up with my friend Alex from Singapore in London after 11 months on opposite sides of the globe and had dinner with my dear friend Liam after 2 months (RECORD BREAKING for us). Relationships were reignited on so many levels. Being 'home' and being with loved ones again was magical.

The week was also a break from the studio to allow myself to think about the next step in my practice before I rush headfirst into anything new. A break away from the new 'norm' has been really helpful. I've had lots of thoughts - mostly fragmented - so the following probably won't make much sense...

I'm thinking of printing more intricate details over the top of my paintings. Perhaps white lino-cut prints or using a white ink pen, of windows, doors and scaffolding structures. I want to give the work a greater depth rather than it feeling incredibly two-dimensional and I feel like this may help 'lighten' the dark layers I currently have going on in my work.

I had a little play on photoshop, to trial how printing or using some sort of media to add a more intricate element to my work would look. I layered one of my paintings which is currently hanging up in my studio with one of my photographs which looks down onto Falmouth Harbour. Using the 'lighten' option, the lighter colours in the photograph showed up over the darker elements of the painting... 

These worked really well. But I don't want the work to be digital - so now that I'm back in the studio I'm going to explore different ways I can create these effects physically, with my hands/a paintbrush/a print press.

I read something last week about social media being like an 'invisible system' for contact between places and between people. Long distance contact is so much easier in the modern world; with FaceTime, texting, phone calls and the like. I'm going to explore mechanical drawing in architecture and use simple lines and geometric mark-making to visually and metaphorically represent the ways relationships are maintained online and telephonically. For example, a sweeping line from one architectural shape to another could represent a telephone line - connecting two people and two sides of a conversation, from miles and miles away...